Mississippi Hot Tamales

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Where does the time go? I’ve missed a whole week of posts. After I started my new job my schedule changed and I’m trying to sync myself to it. So far I haven’t been too successful! But I did manage to get the next state prepared! Mississippi Hot Tamales.

Mississippi Hot Tamales


This little package of deliciousness is made with seasoned meat and wrapped in a corn flour (masa) dough. It can be rolled in corn husks or paper and they are simmered rather than steamed. Some call them “wet” tamales.

No one quite seems to know how the tamale made its way to the Mississippi delta. Some say it was in the early 1900s when the Mexican migrants came to pick cotton. Others suggest they were created by the African Americans working along side the Mexicans. Or did they arrive via the Mexican-American war? The native Americans also used corn flour in a similar manner. Could they have been the first to create this master piece?

Regardless of where they came from, Mississippi has hot tamales served all over the state. And for as many places that serve them, there are just as many variations. So step aside Mississippi Mud Pie, the Hot Tamale is taking over!

Here’s How to Do it:

As I researched hot tamales, I found that, although most places use corn husks to roll them in, some places use parchment paper. My husband loves the canned hot tamales and they are in paper, so I thought, I’ll give it a try. I’ve made Mexican tamales with corn husks, so lets give paper a go.

Start by cooking the meat. I used pork in mine, but really, any kind of meat will work.

Cut the pork into chunks and

hot tamale pork

add it with onion to the chicken stock. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer until the meat is fork tender, about 2 hours.

simmering pork

Drain the meat, but save the broth.

Next, put the meat and the spices in a bowl and

mix and mash until it’s all well blended.

hot tamale filling

And now to assemble –

Place the masa, baking powder, salt and lard in a large bowl.  Blend it with your fingers until is like coarse cornmeal. Slowly add the broth until you have a soft dough, making sure it’s well mixed.

Cut parchment paper into 6 to 8 inch squares. On each piece, spread the dough, pressing until it’s a thin layer.

Place 2 to 3 Tablespoons of meat in the center,

then roll into a long cylinder.

Carefully fold the paper around the dough,

then tie with kitchen twine.

In a deep skillet, bring the broth from the meat and the remaining stock to a boil. Carefully lay the tamales in the broth and cover. Cook for about 20 minutes, then turn them and cook for another 20 to 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the sauce. In a food processor place 1/4 cup of the meat with the broth, tomatoes, chili powder and water. Process until it’s fairly smooth.

Move to a saucepan and heat through.

When the tamales are done, remove the paper and place on a serving platter. Cover with sauce and serve hot.

Mississippi hot tamales

Oh, and it’s best to eat this meat pockets with your fingers not a fork!

Hot Tamales bite

Mississippi Hot Tamales

Similar to the Mexican tamale, this treasure is simmered, not steamed and served all over the state of Mississippi

Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Mississippi
Keyword: appetizer, finger food, masa, mexican, pork, tamale
Author: HelenFern
Ingredients
Tamales
  • 1 pound pork shoulder
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1/2 large onion, cut into thick slices
Masa Dough
  • 2 cups corn flour (masa)
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 cup lard or butter
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock (add slowly - use less or more to make a soft dough)
Filling
  • Cooked pork (from the 1 pound)
  • 1 Tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 Tablespoon hot paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (that's why they are called HOT tamales!)
Sauce
  • 1/4 cup filling (above)
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock
  • 1/4 cup canned, diced tomatoes
  • 2 Tablespoons chili powder
  • 1/2 cup water
Instructions
  1. Start by cooking the meat. I used pork in mine, but really, any kind of meat will work. 

    Add the meat and onion to the chicken stock. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer until the meat is fork tender.

  2. Drain the meat, but save the broth. Put the meat and the spices in a bowl and mix and mash until it's all well blended.

  3. Next, place the masa, baking powder, salt and lard in a large bowl. With your fingers, blend it until is like coarse cornmeal. Slowly add the broth until you have a soft dough. Make sure it's well mixed.

  4. Cut parchment paper into 6 to 8 inch squares. On each piece, spread the dough, pressing until it's a thin layer. 

  5. Place 2 to 3 Tablespoons of meat in the center, then roll into a long cylinder. 

  6. Carefully fold the paper around the dough, then tie with kitchen twine.

  7. In a deep skillet, bring the broth from the meat and an additional cup of stock to a boil. Carefully lay the tamales in the broth and cover. Cook for about 20 minutes, then turn them and cook for another 20 to 30 minutes. 

  8. Meanwhile, make the sauce. In a food processor place 1/4 cup of the meat with the broth, tomatoes, chili powder and water. Process until it's fairly smooth. 

  9. Move to a saucepan and heat through. 

  10. When the tamales are done, remove the paper and place on a serving platter. Cover with sauce and serve hot.

Recipe Notes

You will need a total of 32oz. of chicken stock.

© Copyright 2019 The Lazy Gastronome

Hot Tamales

Here are some things that are perfect to use for this recipe!

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