New Hampshire Clam Chowder

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New England clam chowder is the most popular clam chowder in the U.S. It’s creamy richness is satisfying and the clams fill your mouth with a briny sweetness. And New Hampshire, like most New England states, is known for its seafood.

Also known as Boston Clam Chowder, this creamy soup is believed to have originated in Nova Scotia by the French settlers in the 1700s. It worked its way down the coast and by the 1800s was popular in the United States. It is defines as a “thick chowder made of clams, potatoes, onions, sometimes salt pork, and cream”.


Are you hungry yet?

Here’s How to Do it:

Cut the bacon into chunks. Cook it just until it crisps.

Next melt the butter in a stock pot and sauté the onions until they are soft.

Add the potatoes, garlic, broth, clam juice and old bay and simmer until the potatoes are soft.

Put half the potato mixture into a blender and puree on high until smooth. Put it back into the pot.

Now add the bacon and simmer for about an hour, stirring frequently.

Next add the clams. Simmer on low for 30 minutes.

Now add the cream. Continue to simmer. While it’s simmering, mix up 2 Tablespoon of cream, 2 Tablespoons of broth and 2 Tablespoon of cornstarch. SLOWLY pour into the clam mixture and stir until it’s thickened slightly.

Remove from the heat and add salt and pepper to taste.

Ladle the goodness into bowls, garnish with parsley and enjoy!

New England Clam Chowder (from New Hampshire)
New England clam chowder is the most popular clam chowder in the U.S. It's creamy richness is satisfying and the clams fill your mouth with a briny sweetness. And New Hampshire, like most New England states, is known for its seafood. 
Course: Soup
Keyword: chowder, clams, new england, new hampshire, potatoes, seafood
Servings: 4 people
Author: HelenFern
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 4 thin skinned potatoes (like the creamy red)
  • 2 large cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 2 cup clam juice
  • 2 teaspoons Old Bay seasoning
  • 6 slices bacon, cut into chunks
  • 2/3 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 Tablespoons cornstarch
  • 28 - 30 oz canned chopped clams
  • 4 Tablespoons chopped, fresh parsley - for garnish
  • salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Cut the bacon into chunks. Cook until just starting to crisp.

  2. Melt 3 Tablespoon butter in a stock pot and sauté the onions until they are soft.

  3. Add the potatoes, garlic, all but 2 Tablespoons of the broth, the clam juice and old bay and simmer until the potatoes are soft.

  4. Put half the potato mixture into a blender and puree on high until smooth. 

  5. Pour the puree back into the pot. Now add the bacon and simmer for about an hour, stirring frequently.

  6. Next add the clams. Simmer on low for 30 minutes. 

  7. Now add the cream. Continue to simmer. 

  8. While it's simmering, mix up 2 Tablespoon of cream, 2 Tablespoons of broth and 2 Tablespoon of cornstarch. SLOWLY pour into the clam mixture and stir until it's thickened slightly.

  9. Remove from the heat and add salt and pepper to taste.
  10. Ladle the goodness into bowls, garnish with parsley and enjoy!

© Copyright 2019 The Lazy Gastronome

 

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4 Responses to New Hampshire Clam Chowder

  1. Teresa says:

    Oh, this sounds wonderful! Thank you for sharing the recipe at The Really Crafty Link Party. Pinned!

  2. Mother of 3 says:

    I love a good New England clam chowder! Having grown up in this are I enjoy both Rhode Island red chowder and the thick creamy New England version– as long as I can have some clam fritters to go with them. Pinned.

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