Pennsylvania Scrapple and Dippy Eggs

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It’s Friday and that means some food from another state. The next in line after Delaware is Pennsylvania. One of the first thirteen colonies, this state has a rich history and a diverse culture. The Dutch were the first to settle here, in Lancaster County. There were many German immigrants as well and the influence of the two cultures are still prevalent in today’s culture.  Scrapple, a dish made of pork trimmings and cornmeal, is considered a Pennsylvania Dutch ethnic food – and it’s popular all over the state and then some!


Pennsylvania is known for a lot of great things – more than 50% of the mushrooms grown in the U.S. come from here. And who doesn’t know what a Philly cheese steak is? Then there are shoo fly pies, whoopie pies and pot pies… And of course, there’s Hershey Pennsylvania.

But this post is my take on scrapple and dippy eggs. What are dippy eggs you ask? Just eggs over easy.

Dippy eggs were originally eaten cheese toast triangles or marmite (the British influence) but they are great with scrapple and toast for breakfast. Bringing the British (dippy eggs) together with the Dutch (scrapple) and you have this delicious, Pennsylvania breakfast!

Here’s How to Do it:

You start a day or two early to make the scrapple. Although traditionally made with things like pigs feet, skins, left over pieces from butchering, I chose to make it with simply ground pork and a little fat (Trying to be healthier…).

Place the ground pork, sage, minced onion, paprika and water into a medium sauce pan.

 

 

 

 

Bring it all to a boil, then simmer for about 30 minutes, reducing the water by about half or less.

Remove from the heat and puree it in a food processor or blender or blender with the bacon fat. (Be sure to keep the lid off to vent the steam).

Put it back in the pan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and stir in the corn meal and hot sauce. Simmer until it is a thick paste – like mashed potatoes. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Rub some butter on the sides and bottom of a glass loaf pan.

Pour in the meat mixture and

smooth it down, then cover and refrigerate for at least 12 hours.

When you’re ready to start breakfast, remove the scrapple from the loaf pan and slice.

Heat the oil and a little butter in a skilled until the butter is foamy. Lay the scrapple slices in and cook for about 5 minutes, then flip and cook the other side. It should be golden and crispy on both sides.

While it’s cooking, time to do the eggs. Heat some oil in a heavy skillet. Crack the eggs and cook for about 2 minutes. CAREFULLY, (why it’s called over easy) turn the eggs and cook another 1 to 2 minutes.

Serve the eggs with the scrapple and some toast on the side. Oh just yum!

Scrapple and Dippy Eggs

Bringing the British (dippy eggs) together with the Dutch (scrapple) and you have this delicious, Pennsylvania breakfast!

Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Keyword: british, dutch, eggs, german, Pennsylvania, pork
Servings: 4 people
Author: HelenFern
Ingredients
Scrapple
  • 3/4 pound ground pork
  • 2 teapoons dried, rubbed sage
  • 1 teaspoon hot paprika
  • 2 Tablespoons dried, minced onion
  • 1-1/2 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground, black pepper
  • 1/2 cup cornmeal
  • 1 teaspoon hot sauce, like tabasco or Franks
  • 2 Tablespoons cooking oil (canola is good)
  • 1 Tablespoon salted butter
Eggs
  • 4 Large eggs
  • 1 Tablespoon oil
Instructions
Scrapple
  1. You start a day or two early to make the scrapple. Although traditionally made with things like pigs feet, skins, left over pieces from butchering, I chose to make it with simply ground pork and a little fat (Trying to be healthier...). 

  2. Place the ground pork, sage, minced onion, paprika and water into a medium sauce pan. Bring it all to a boil, then simmer for about 30 minutes, reducing the water by about half or less.

  3. Remove from the heat and puree it in a food processor or blender or blender with the bacon fat. (Be sure to keep the lid off to vent the steam).

  4. Put it back in the pan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and stir in the corn meal and hot sauce. Simmer until it is a thick paste - like mashed potatoes. Add salt and pepper to taste.

  5. Rub butter inside a glass loaf pan and pour in the mixture. Smooth the top and cover. Refrigerate for at least 12 hours.

  6. When you're ready to start breakfast, remove the scrapple from the loaf pan and slice.

  7. Heat the oil and a little butter in a skilled until the butter is foamy. Lay the scrapple slices in and cook for about 5 minutes, then flip and cook the other side. It should be golden and crispy on both sides.

Eggs
  1. While it's cooking, time to do the eggs. Heat some oil in a heavy skillet. Crack the eggs and cook for about 2 minutes. CAREFULLY, (why it's called over easy) turn the eggs and cook another 1 to 2 minutes.

EAT!
  1. Serve the eggs with the scrapple and some toast on the side. Oh just yum!

© Copyright 2019 The Lazy Gastronome

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6 Responses to Pennsylvania Scrapple and Dippy Eggs

  1. An interesting dish – I’m guessing it’s a bit like a meatloaf but with eggs in!? Maybe I’ll try it with lamb mince for the boys! Thanks for bringing to Fiesta Friday (do we add the party link ourselves to your “Blog Hoppy” page?!)

    • HelenFern says:

      There are no eggs in the scrapple – it’s bound with cornmeal. It is called “scrap”ple because it was originally made with all the meat scraps. It’s pretty good!

  2. Having grown up in Pennsylvania, I remember my family eating scrapple! Thanks for sharing with us at the Snickerdoodle link party!

    • HelenFern says:

      Thanks Roseann – I believe the original scrapple was called that because it literally used the scraps from the pig. I chose an easier route. And we really enjoyed it!! Thanks for stopping by.

  3. Teresa says:

    I’d never heard of this dish before, but it looks delicious.
    Thank you for sharing at The Really Crafty Link Party. Pinned!

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